How to register for courses in Nuuk

To apply for courses in the Arctic Science Study Programme (ASSP), please complete the “Student Information” form below. After submitting the completed form you will receive an e-mail with details on how to proceed with register for the courses and other practical information.

The ASSP offers graduate (masters) and PhD level courses. The courses in spring and autumn each form two full semester (30 ECTS). Applicants applying for a full semester are given priority, however, it is possible to apply for single courses. You can find more information about the courses under Arctic Science Study Programme (ASSP).

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Please check your Junk e-mail folder if you have not received the e-mail with instructions within 1 hour of submitting the completed form. If a problem persists, please write an e-mail directly to the ASSP coordination team ASSP@natur.gl
 

Canada and Greenland at the forefront of Inuit self-determination in research Published 10.12.2021

This time of year is a special one for Arctic researchers and experts as they get together to share stories, research results, and celebrate their achievements during one of the largest Arctic research gatherings in the world. This week, the Canadian research network ArcticNet hosted its Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM2021) virtually with more than 1,000 attendees from 17 countries. All week, a range of academic, government, Northern, and Indigenous and Inuit researchers and experts addressed the numerous environmental, social, economic, and political challenges and opportunities emerging from climate change and modernization in the Arctic.

ArcticNet fully recognizes Inuit and Indigenous leadership and self-determination in Arctic research, and supports the Inuit-led, governed and directed research program “Inuit Qaujisarnirmut Pilirijjutit.”  At ASM2021, Bjarne “Ababsi” Lyberth, director of KNAPK, and Victoria Qutuuq Buschman, postdoctoral fellow at the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, provided inspiring examples of such self-determination during a panel discussion about conservation and biodiversity in the Last Arctic Ice Area. Bjarne Lyberth presented the historical perspective and cultural importance of this region located in the north of Greenland and Canada, and his involvement in the Inuit-led Pikialasorsuaq Commission. Victoria Qutuuq Buschman, who is originally from Utqiagvik, Alaska, shared her experiences and perspectives during the panel discussion with empowering words: “When it comes to climate change adaptation and conservation, we can do it together. We have done it together, and we will continue to do it together.”

“I really enjoy ArcticNet meetings,” says Caroline Bouchard, researcher at the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, who attended the ASM for the 10th time since the first one in 2004. “They are like a week-long kaffemik, a place where you reconnect with old friends and make new ones around hot beverages and good food.

This year for the ASM, Caroline Bouchard organized a thematic session about sailboats and small boats as research platforms in the Arctic.

Many citizen science initiatives were presented, including an ongoing project led by Patrick Farnole, PhD student at the University of Victoria, in which Uummannaq fishers and children collaborate with scientists and take measurements in the ocean.

 

For further information, contact:
Scientist Caroline Bouchard, Greenland Climate Research Centre, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources Phone: 36 12 00 Email: cabo@natur.gl